splodgenoodles: (Default)
A man with cerebral palsy talks about his sex life.

A truly lovely series of images and video of a man with cerebral palsy. The pictures are sensual and erotic.

I love that in the video, the subtitles are displayed in a non-uniform way. All too often, it's easy to tune out a person with difference of speech and uniform subtitles provide clarity without creating a connection. The text in this video has expressive power that draws you in and reduces your capacity to simply objectify the subject.
splodgenoodles: (Default)
The information that has filtered through to layman's websites about IBD:

About.com: Smoking, nicotine and IBD. Smokers with Crohn's Disease have worse disease outcomes, but Ulcerative Colitis is a disease of non-smokers and ex-smokers. Needless to say, smoking is still considered to have far worse outcomes than UC, so returning to smoking is not recommended.

Transdermal nicotine for mildly to moderative ulcerative colitis. A rondomised, double-blind, placebo controlled trial. (64 subjects. Found it was successful)



Preliminary Observations of Oral Nicotine Therapy for IBD.


Smoking and Nicotine in IBD - Good or Bad For Cytokines? Review Article.


And here's an intersting one: the authors of this study suggest the benefits or harms of nicotine on the course of IBD depends not on which disease you have, but where the inflammation is located. I mostly have colitis, inflammation of the colon, although the overall disease is Crohn's Disease (which can mean inflammation anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract), while ulcerative colitis only occurs in the colon (d'uh). So this would make a lot of sense.
Effect of Smoking on Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Is It Disease or Organ Specific?
splodgenoodles: (Default)
The information that has filtered through to layman's websites about IBD:

About.com: Smoking, nicotine and IBD. Smokers with Crohn's Disease have worse disease outcomes, but Ulcerative Colitis is a disease of non-smokers and ex-smokers. Needless to say, smoking is still considered to have far worse outcomes than UC, so returning to smoking is not recommended.

Transdermal nicotine for mildly to moderative ulcerative colitis. A rondomised, double-blind, placebo controlled trial. (64 subjects. Found it was successful)



Preliminary Observations of Oral Nicotine Therapy for IBD.


Smoking and Nicotine in IBD - Good or Bad For Cytokines? Review Article.


And here's an intersting one: the authors of this study suggest the benefits or harms of nicotine on the course of IBD depends not on which disease you have, but where the inflammation is located. I mostly have colitis, inflammation of the colon, although the overall disease is Crohn's Disease (which can mean inflammation anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract), while ulcerative colitis only occurs in the colon (d'uh). So this would make a lot of sense.
Effect of Smoking on Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Is It Disease or Organ Specific?
splodgenoodles: (Default)
In The Theatre, by Dannie Abse.


(A true incident)

‘Only a local anaesthetic was given because of the blood pressure problem. The patient, thus, was fully awake throughout the operation. But in those days—in 1938, in Cardiff, when I was Lambert Rogers’ dresser—they could not locate a brain tumour with precision. Too much normal brain tissue was destroyed as the surgeon searched for it, before he felt the resistance of it … all somewhat hit and miss. One operation I shall never forget … ’
(Dr Wilfred Abse)


Sister saying—‘Soon you’ll be back in the ward,’
sister thinking—‘Only two more on the list,’
the patient saying—‘Thank you, I feel fine’;
small voices, small lies, nothing untoward,
though, soon, he would blink again and again
because of the fingers of Lambert Rogers,
rash as a blind man’s, inside his soft brain.

If items of horror can make a man laugh
then laugh at this: one hour later, the growth
still undiscovered, ticking its own wild time;
more brain mashed because of the probe’s braille path;
Lambert Rogers desperate, fingering still;
his dresser thinking, ‘Christ! Two more on the list,
a cisternal puncture and a neural cyst.’

Then, suddenly, the cracked record in the brain,
a ventriloquist voice that cried, ‘You sod,
leave my soul alone, leave my soul alone,’—
the patient’s dummy lips moving to that refrain,
the patient’s eyes too wide. And, shocked,
Lambert Rogers drawing out the probe
with nurses, students, sister, petrified.

‘Leave my soul alone, leave my soul alone,’
that voice so arctic and that cry so odd
had nowhere else to go—till the antique
gramophone wound down and the words began
to blur and slow, ‘ … leave … my … soul … alone … ’
to cease at last when something other died.
And silence matched the silence under snow.

Dannie Abse, “In the Theatre” from New and Collected Poems, published by Hutchinson. Used by permission of The Random House Group Limited, http://www.randomhouse.co.uk.

Source: White Coat, Purple Coat: Collected Poems 1948-1988 (1994)





via Mind Hacks blog.
splodgenoodles: (Default)
In The Theatre, by Dannie Abse.


(A true incident)

‘Only a local anaesthetic was given because of the blood pressure problem. The patient, thus, was fully awake throughout the operation. But in those days—in 1938, in Cardiff, when I was Lambert Rogers’ dresser—they could not locate a brain tumour with precision. Too much normal brain tissue was destroyed as the surgeon searched for it, before he felt the resistance of it … all somewhat hit and miss. One operation I shall never forget … ’
(Dr Wilfred Abse)


Sister saying—‘Soon you’ll be back in the ward,’
sister thinking—‘Only two more on the list,’
the patient saying—‘Thank you, I feel fine’;
small voices, small lies, nothing untoward,
though, soon, he would blink again and again
because of the fingers of Lambert Rogers,
rash as a blind man’s, inside his soft brain.

If items of horror can make a man laugh
then laugh at this: one hour later, the growth
still undiscovered, ticking its own wild time;
more brain mashed because of the probe’s braille path;
Lambert Rogers desperate, fingering still;
his dresser thinking, ‘Christ! Two more on the list,
a cisternal puncture and a neural cyst.’

Then, suddenly, the cracked record in the brain,
a ventriloquist voice that cried, ‘You sod,
leave my soul alone, leave my soul alone,’—
the patient’s dummy lips moving to that refrain,
the patient’s eyes too wide. And, shocked,
Lambert Rogers drawing out the probe
with nurses, students, sister, petrified.

‘Leave my soul alone, leave my soul alone,’
that voice so arctic and that cry so odd
had nowhere else to go—till the antique
gramophone wound down and the words began
to blur and slow, ‘ … leave … my … soul … alone … ’
to cease at last when something other died.
And silence matched the silence under snow.

Dannie Abse, “In the Theatre” from New and Collected Poems, published by Hutchinson. Used by permission of The Random House Group Limited, http://www.randomhouse.co.uk.

Source: White Coat, Purple Coat: Collected Poems 1948-1988 (1994)





via Mind Hacks blog.

Link Dump.

Nov. 15th, 2009 02:06 pm
splodgenoodles: (Default)
Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories are turning me to the dark side. They are the ones that do DIY Cylon Eyes.

The Well Trained Mind. I'm not about to get into it (I have enough on my brain already), but the conversation was fascinating so I'm putting it here so I don't lose the reference.

Regina Holliday and her mural re-the American health care problem and her husband's death. It's a good looking piece of work, I'm hoping she (or someone) will produce a print of the actual mural.

Alexander Calder, kinetic sculpture. Wire sculptures. ArtGuy suggested I look at his stuff. Like this wire stuff especially.

Link Dump.

Nov. 15th, 2009 02:06 pm
splodgenoodles: (Default)
Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories are turning me to the dark side. They are the ones that do DIY Cylon Eyes.

The Well Trained Mind. I'm not about to get into it (I have enough on my brain already), but the conversation was fascinating so I'm putting it here so I don't lose the reference.

Regina Holliday and her mural re-the American health care problem and her husband's death. It's a good looking piece of work, I'm hoping she (or someone) will produce a print of the actual mural.

Alexander Calder, kinetic sculpture. Wire sculptures. ArtGuy suggested I look at his stuff. Like this wire stuff especially.
splodgenoodles: (Default)
I'm now using LJ for linkage. Beats losing everything when the hard drive eventually crashes, no?

Kenya Remix!

And the original: here.

I could watch these for hours, it's quite frightening really.
splodgenoodles: (Default)
I'm now using LJ for linkage. Beats losing everything when the hard drive eventually crashes, no?

Kenya Remix!

And the original: here.

I could watch these for hours, it's quite frightening really.
splodgenoodles: (Default)
In the absence of anything else, I refer you to

The Gorilla In Your House.
splodgenoodles: (Default)
In the absence of anything else, I refer you to

The Gorilla In Your House.
splodgenoodles: (Default)
A brief but worthwhile article about cognitive dysfunction and how it effects people with ME/CFS.

Most useful for friends and relatives. If you have ME/CFS it's probably a bit too complicated and/or old news, so you're excused.

Includes a nice illustration of the type of strategies we end up employing to manage better with our particular version of cognitive dysfunction.


It's all in a nutshell and won't take long, so if you're interested in understanding ME/CFS, please have a read.

Thanks to [livejournal.com profile] rickybuchanan for digging it out for me.
splodgenoodles: (Default)
A brief but worthwhile article about cognitive dysfunction and how it effects people with ME/CFS.

Most useful for friends and relatives. If you have ME/CFS it's probably a bit too complicated and/or old news, so you're excused.

Includes a nice illustration of the type of strategies we end up employing to manage better with our particular version of cognitive dysfunction.


It's all in a nutshell and won't take long, so if you're interested in understanding ME/CFS, please have a read.

Thanks to [livejournal.com profile] rickybuchanan for digging it out for me.
splodgenoodles: (Penelope intro)
If there's one good thing about our house at this time of year it's that the early morning sun streams right into the bedroom window and I only need to prop on pillows to soak it up.

I feel like I'm devouring it, like it was

CAKE

or something.


In other news, I'm feeling a little embarrassed about my insistence that I was developing a cold. Well, I suspect I might possibly have got a virus but the ME/CFIDS is such that rather than have a regular cold I'm having an ME/CFIDS flare. The last two days I have been a veritable human pancake.

But at least I can consume sunlight, no sensory overload on that front. I slept well last night and am not feeling too bad right now, so maybe today will be better. I seem to have finally gotten wise about not pushing myself when it's flaring - it's only taken nearly 8 years and deterioration to the level of recluse, but maybe I'm getting there.

It's funny that people think of ME/CFIDS/CFS/whateveryouwanttocallit as an absence. A lack of energy, drive, oomph. It's not. (I certainly don't lack drive...) It's a presence in the same way many other illnesses are experienced not as absences but things. With teeth and momentum of their own. When I'm operating within my safe limits and not aggravating my symptoms, it's not because I'm worried simply about "lacking" energy tomorrow. I'm trying to avoid a whole bag of agonies. The disease has phases that I've come to think of as blast phases, when it goes ballistic and I'm the target.

It's a shame that I'm not very reflective or creative these days, all I seem to do is update how my health is at any given moment. I live in hope that at some point I'll get my bounce back.

In the meanwhile, this is a promising article on the CFS basics. It was published in the British Nursing Journal (and I really hope I'm not infringing copyright by putting the whole thing here but I suspect people are more likely to read it here than follow a link and/or pay money for it, and I think it should be read widely). The fact that such an article is published in such a journal may mean that we are getting closer to that magical day when we overturn the dominant paradigm and get things moving in the right direction at last.

It will take you about five minutes to read this, it's a good CFS primer.

The debate: myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome
------------------------------------------------------------------

Charles Shepherd

Dr Charles Shepherd is Medical Adviser to the ME Association

Accepted for publication: May 2006


Abstract: )

Introduction )

Nomenclature: a disease of many names. )

Symptoms and definitions. )

Disability assessment and quality of life. )

Epidemiology )

Aetiology, pathogenesis and disease associations. )

Predisposing factors )

Precipitating factors. )


Perpetuating factors. )

Maintaining factors linked to the actual illness. )

Associated conditions. )

Diagnostic assessment. )

Children and adolescents. )

MANAGEMENT: General Principles )

Pharmacological treatments. )

Symptomatic relief. )

Pain. )

Irritable bowel syndrome. )

Sleep disturbance. )

Depression. )

Non-pharmacological management. )

Prognosis )

Figure caption

Figure 1: Diagram to illustrate how ME/CFS may involve the central nervous
system.


Differential diagnosis of an ME/CFS-like illness. Table. )

KEY POINTS: )


References. )

~~~

What I find impressive about this article is the way in which Shepherd has kept the focus on facts about the illness and its management, with good referencing, and has managed to describe the various controversies and false beliefs about the illness in an objective way, without giving the lunatic fringe the level of attention they often get as people strive to prove them wrong.

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