splodgenoodles: (Default)
Because she directed me to this:

(Possibley NSFW, depending on screen resolution)
I AM VINDICATED

Hooray for people having sex while helicopters hover overhead and I must also say, I think I'll be spending a lot of time at this blog for the next couple of weeks. Just my kind of Tour watching.
splodgenoodles: (Default)
Compulsory viewing. I may have linked to this before, but if so it was a while ago and unlike many classic works of comedy, it has not aged.


splodgenoodles: (Default)
Compulsory viewing. I may have linked to this before, but if so it was a while ago and unlike many classic works of comedy, it has not aged.


Thursday.

Apr. 10th, 2008 02:55 pm
splodgenoodles: (Default)
We have too many pumpkins!

I didn't even plant any, they just appeared.

~~~~

I am still reading that book on the Etruscans. Written in the 70s, so I don't know if it's been completely superceded by now, but it's what I found on the shelf when I was hungry for the learning last time I was in the library.

Point being, the Etruscans had an amazing amount of knowledge and skill in agricultural technology: they transformed the landscape with irrigation and drainage, enabling intensive and varied food production and took that part of Italy out of the Bronze Age. Yet they also believed in fate and predestination to a degree that astounded even the other fairly fatalistic cultures around them. I suppose it's not that contradictory really. Predestined to advance and flourish and change and transform - or not. Ultimately other forces decide how far you can go with that.

And they read thunderstorms. And livers. Big on the livers. I wonder why people don't read livers now? After all these were wise people - scientists, even. And afterwards you could have a nice lunch.

~~~~

I did my customary glance over the internet for ME/CFS research the other day - I do it every so often in the vague hope that someone has found a cure. I can't say I hold my breath when I do, but I'd feel like a right berk if everyone else had found and taken the Magic Pill and I was still slouching round at home when I could be out jogging and building rocket ships and all those other things that need doing, so I do the right thing and have a bit of a look before going back to watching the paint peel and wondering about livers. Needless to say, no one's come up with anything yet although some of the anti-viral research looks promising and there's a new major split in the research community, including bonus arguments over a new latest definition of CFS, shoot me now.

Rather than detail this, I'll just refer anyone curious to Phoenix Rising, Cort Johnson's excellent newsletter, scroll down for the article.

The other thing I found was Etiology of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Testing Popular Hypotheses
Using a National Birth Cohort Study.


Journal: Psychosom Med. 2008 Mar 31 [Epub ahead of print]

Authors: Harvey SB, Wadsworth M, Wessely S, Hotopf M.
Affiliations: Institute of Psychiatry (S.B.H., S.W., M.H.), King's
College London, London, UK; Medical Research Council's National
Survey of Health and Development (M.W.), Department of Epidemiology
and Public Health, Royal Free and UCL Medical School, London, UK.

PMID: 18378866


Objective: To review the etiology of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)
and test hypotheses relating to immune system dysfunction, physical
deconditioning, exercise avoidance, and childhood illness
experiences, using a large prospective birth cohort.

Methods, results: )
Conclusions: Individuals who exercise frequently are more likely to
report a diagnosis of CFS in later life. This may be due to the
direct effects of this behavior or associated personality factors.
Continuing to be active despite increasing fatigue may be a crucial
step in the development of CFS.


Given the authorship of this article, maybe a few diehards are finally coming to their senses. They will cling on to the importance of pysch and personality issues, of course - that's their baby, that's what they've devoted their lives to. And I guess they might be right, up to a point - I don't think we know enough to know yet. But the 'evidence based' overturning of the excercise phobia myth is a good start.

~~~~

Thursday.

Apr. 10th, 2008 02:55 pm
splodgenoodles: (Default)
We have too many pumpkins!

I didn't even plant any, they just appeared.

~~~~

I am still reading that book on the Etruscans. Written in the 70s, so I don't know if it's been completely superceded by now, but it's what I found on the shelf when I was hungry for the learning last time I was in the library.

Point being, the Etruscans had an amazing amount of knowledge and skill in agricultural technology: they transformed the landscape with irrigation and drainage, enabling intensive and varied food production and took that part of Italy out of the Bronze Age. Yet they also believed in fate and predestination to a degree that astounded even the other fairly fatalistic cultures around them. I suppose it's not that contradictory really. Predestined to advance and flourish and change and transform - or not. Ultimately other forces decide how far you can go with that.

And they read thunderstorms. And livers. Big on the livers. I wonder why people don't read livers now? After all these were wise people - scientists, even. And afterwards you could have a nice lunch.

~~~~

I did my customary glance over the internet for ME/CFS research the other day - I do it every so often in the vague hope that someone has found a cure. I can't say I hold my breath when I do, but I'd feel like a right berk if everyone else had found and taken the Magic Pill and I was still slouching round at home when I could be out jogging and building rocket ships and all those other things that need doing, so I do the right thing and have a bit of a look before going back to watching the paint peel and wondering about livers. Needless to say, no one's come up with anything yet although some of the anti-viral research looks promising and there's a new major split in the research community, including bonus arguments over a new latest definition of CFS, shoot me now.

Rather than detail this, I'll just refer anyone curious to Phoenix Rising, Cort Johnson's excellent newsletter, scroll down for the article.

The other thing I found was Etiology of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Testing Popular Hypotheses
Using a National Birth Cohort Study.


Journal: Psychosom Med. 2008 Mar 31 [Epub ahead of print]

Authors: Harvey SB, Wadsworth M, Wessely S, Hotopf M.
Affiliations: Institute of Psychiatry (S.B.H., S.W., M.H.), King's
College London, London, UK; Medical Research Council's National
Survey of Health and Development (M.W.), Department of Epidemiology
and Public Health, Royal Free and UCL Medical School, London, UK.

PMID: 18378866


Objective: To review the etiology of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)
and test hypotheses relating to immune system dysfunction, physical
deconditioning, exercise avoidance, and childhood illness
experiences, using a large prospective birth cohort.

Methods, results: )
Conclusions: Individuals who exercise frequently are more likely to
report a diagnosis of CFS in later life. This may be due to the
direct effects of this behavior or associated personality factors.
Continuing to be active despite increasing fatigue may be a crucial
step in the development of CFS.


Given the authorship of this article, maybe a few diehards are finally coming to their senses. They will cling on to the importance of pysch and personality issues, of course - that's their baby, that's what they've devoted their lives to. And I guess they might be right, up to a point - I don't think we know enough to know yet. But the 'evidence based' overturning of the excercise phobia myth is a good start.

~~~~
splodgenoodles: (Default)
I've been meaning to post this for a while. It's one man's story about deliberately infesting himself with hookworm in order to see if it would cure his asthma and [livejournal.com profile] mishymoocow and I were discussing it when she visited a week or two ago, so here it is.

It's a few minutes reading but he is an engaging writer and it's not the sort of story you read everyday.
splodgenoodles: (Default)
I've been meaning to post this for a while. It's one man's story about deliberately infesting himself with hookworm in order to see if it would cure his asthma and [livejournal.com profile] mishymoocow and I were discussing it when she visited a week or two ago, so here it is.

It's a few minutes reading but he is an engaging writer and it's not the sort of story you read everyday.
splodgenoodles: (Default)
Via [livejournal.com profile] mind_hacks who got it from somewhere else:

This is a beautiful animation and filk (is that the right word?) of the Gilbert and Sullivan song by one Stephen Stahl, a psychopharmacologist of great reknown in psychopharmacological circles, apparently.

It goes for two and half minutes and you'll need the sound on:



I think I'd like to meet him and ask if I can have some of what he's having.
splodgenoodles: (Default)
Via [livejournal.com profile] mind_hacks who got it from somewhere else:

This is a beautiful animation and filk (is that the right word?) of the Gilbert and Sullivan song by one Stephen Stahl, a psychopharmacologist of great reknown in psychopharmacological circles, apparently.

It goes for two and half minutes and you'll need the sound on:



I think I'd like to meet him and ask if I can have some of what he's having.
splodgenoodles: (Lock stock stoner eyes)
This takes one and a half minutes, make sure the sound's on.

Cat Man Do by Simon Tofield of Tandem Films.




Thanks to [livejournal.com profile] technomom for this one.

In other news, I had a whale of a time yesterday at the wedding of [livejournal.com profile] doushkasmum and [livejournal.com profile] sacred_chao. They are two very lucky people.

I have declared today a horizontal day and it's actually feeling pleasantly decadent rather than an endurance test. This might have something to do with [livejournal.com profile] tenbears fishing out his dark blue silk dressinggown for me to lounge around in, or the chocolate truffle I just found in the fridge, or maybe both.

It's a crap day outside, warm and really, really windy. Both the cats and myself have windbrain**, another good reason for staying in bed. OutsideCat has it so badly that she's refusing to leave the laundry and even hid in her extra secret hiding place for a while this morning, just to be on the safe side.

I've got another knitting machine. More on that later.


~~~

Windbrain: a state of discombobulation bought on by windy weather. Coined, I believe, by [livejournal.com profile] monstah.
splodgenoodles: (Lock stock stoner eyes)
This takes one and a half minutes, make sure the sound's on.

Cat Man Do by Simon Tofield of Tandem Films.




Thanks to [livejournal.com profile] technomom for this one.

In other news, I had a whale of a time yesterday at the wedding of [livejournal.com profile] doushkasmum and [livejournal.com profile] sacred_chao. They are two very lucky people.

I have declared today a horizontal day and it's actually feeling pleasantly decadent rather than an endurance test. This might have something to do with [livejournal.com profile] tenbears fishing out his dark blue silk dressinggown for me to lounge around in, or the chocolate truffle I just found in the fridge, or maybe both.

It's a crap day outside, warm and really, really windy. Both the cats and myself have windbrain**, another good reason for staying in bed. OutsideCat has it so badly that she's refusing to leave the laundry and even hid in her extra secret hiding place for a while this morning, just to be on the safe side.

I've got another knitting machine. More on that later.


~~~

Windbrain: a state of discombobulation bought on by windy weather. Coined, I believe, by [livejournal.com profile] monstah.
splodgenoodles: (The delinquent daisy)
This link is primarily for the benefit of that infamous punmeister, [livejournal.com profile] mr_bassman, although since I link to other stuff so rarely, I do hope you'll all be curious enough to have a look.

A Tale Of Two Prawns.

Not that I'm feeling sadistic or anything.
splodgenoodles: (The delinquent daisy)
This link is primarily for the benefit of that infamous punmeister, [livejournal.com profile] mr_bassman, although since I link to other stuff so rarely, I do hope you'll all be curious enough to have a look.

A Tale Of Two Prawns.

Not that I'm feeling sadistic or anything.
splodgenoodles: (Default)
The most recent antics of our Prime Minister have left me feeling nauseous. He is a man who will use anything for his own gain. Election, anyone? Or perhaps you'd just like to dig up some ground without needing local permission?

[livejournal.com profile] box3's post is worth reading, it sums things up quite nicely.

You've got to hand it to Howard for picking something that will have us all fighting amongst ourselves.
splodgenoodles: (Default)
The most recent antics of our Prime Minister have left me feeling nauseous. He is a man who will use anything for his own gain. Election, anyone? Or perhaps you'd just like to dig up some ground without needing local permission?

[livejournal.com profile] box3's post is worth reading, it sums things up quite nicely.

You've got to hand it to Howard for picking something that will have us all fighting amongst ourselves.
splodgenoodles: (Lady Penelope's does her thing)
From The Age today:

The Defence Department has confirmed a report Iranian naval forces in the Persian Gulf tried to capture an Australian navy boarding team but were repelled in the face of machine guns and "highly colourful language".


I'm suspect several stubbies would have been thrown as well, but they're probably keeping that quiet for political reasons. (We don't want the UN involved, after all.)
splodgenoodles: (Lady Penelope's does her thing)
From The Age today:

The Defence Department has confirmed a report Iranian naval forces in the Persian Gulf tried to capture an Australian navy boarding team but were repelled in the face of machine guns and "highly colourful language".


I'm suspect several stubbies would have been thrown as well, but they're probably keeping that quiet for political reasons. (We don't want the UN involved, after all.)
splodgenoodles: (Default)
There was a train crash in rural Victoria today. Here.

A semi-trailer ran into the side of it.

Eleven dead so far, and last I read there were still 13 people unaccounted for and given it wasn't a huge train, that's not a good sign.





Maybe it seems odd, but I keep wondering how the truck driver is coping.
splodgenoodles: (Default)
There was a train crash in rural Victoria today. Here.

A semi-trailer ran into the side of it.

Eleven dead so far, and last I read there were still 13 people unaccounted for and given it wasn't a huge train, that's not a good sign.





Maybe it seems odd, but I keep wondering how the truck driver is coping.

Awake.

May. 28th, 2007 06:20 am
splodgenoodles: (Default)
I've slept really well. I went to bed early. Yay.

I'm now sitting in the study, naked. A few minutes ago I opened the back door to check on OutsideCat. It's slightly chilly but not uncomfortably so. The Bureau is predicting 'a shower or two' and 19.

It's May.

I should be bitching about the cold. In fact, even though I'm awake I should be in bed huddled up against 10B, with the cat on top of us both, because it's so fucking cold.

It's eerie having heat and warmth with the miniscule amounts of sunlight we're getting. And it's that golden winter sunlight that I simply don't associate with heat.

The long range forecasts are not bleak, but they've not been bleak for a while now and the weather's still fucked. It seems people are hoping for a La Nina to bring above-average rain, but given we were already in drought and on water restrictions when last year's El Nino popped up (ie - we were already in a drought when the harbinger of drought came along), I'm not sure it's going to make a whole lot of difference. We'll need a few years of La Ninas. Not bloody likely.

I've had volunteer tomatoes sprouting. And sweet corn. But then stuff just dies because there's no water.

I wonder if the main focus of our lives will end up being not all our little hopes and activities and aspirations, but how to survive in the face of the biggest disaster in human history.

I used to think if this happened it would be because of war. Hmmm. Always claimed to have been environmentally aware and all that, but didn't quite see it catching up this fast or right now.

Am even more flabbergasted at people doing the whole 'we can't adopt green strategies because they're bad for the economy' line. Have they looked outside lately? bugger all water = bugger all economy.

Actually no, scrub that. bugger all water = a very good economy if you happen to control what water there is.

Cynical, moi?

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